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Digital Thesis & Project Room

 

DTPR MAIS: Athabasca University Digital Thesis & Project Room

 
 
Description

MAIS 701: Integrated Project. Mais 701 is normally the final course that students take in their program and is designed to facilitate extended research work under the direction of a course professor. The scope of the project must fall within the research area of faculty members associated with MAIS. The Integrated Project allows students to explore an intellectual question, to relate their research to a work situation, or to engage a community problem. Theoretical and empirical approaches should draw from the student's course work and demonstrate an integrative approach to knowledge creation. The project may involve field, archival, and library research, and will result in the production of a major report or paper. A project may combine a theoretical synopsis with applied work to produce an academic publication, innovative report, analysis, review, or enquiry into a chosen field. In other words, the project integrates learning from the MAIS program.

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Equity Studies

Atwal, S. S. (2017). The Importance of Equal Access to Post-Secondary Education in Canada for People with Disabilities, With a Case Study in Improving Equity of Access to Post-Secondary Education for Students with Disabilities ©

Availability:Open access

Barg, K. P. (2017). Supporting a convicted rapist: Content analysis of the letters sent on behalf of Brock Turner ©

Availability:Open access

Bent, K. (2004). Aboriginal Women’s Health Issues: A Holistic Perspective on Wellness. Master of Integrated Studies - Final Research Project, Athabasca University. ©

Availability:Open access

Carson, K. L. (2011). Media (Mis)Representations: Depictions of Women in Nordic Countries and North America ©

Availability:Open access

Casson, S. (2013). Services and Supports for Recently Landed Immigrant Women Looking for Work or Training for Work in Peel Region ©

Availability:Open access

Cowtun, V. E. (2020). Obstacles to Effectively Eradicating Domestic Violence: Community Empowerment, Effective Policy Design, and the Law ©

Availability:Open access

Crane, C. A. (2020). Public Pedagogy: Educators, Public Intellectuals, and the Possibilities for Resistance ©

Availability:Open access

Draper, R. EDWARD. (2015). The Canadian Forces Military Police: Exploring the need for Comprehensive Peace Officer Status in accordance with Federal and Provincial Statute Law ©

Availability:Open access

Francis, G. (2011). ISSUES SURROUNDING RESPONSES TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IN CANADA: RETHINKING THE NEEDS OF ABUSED WOMEN ©

Availability:Open access

Fuko, M. (2019). Dark Matters: Exploring the intersections of gender and race in STEMM academia ©

Availability:Open access

Gibb, C. S. (2014). Integrating Diversity: The equitable inclusion of a person with cognitive disabilities in a United Church of Canada congregation in Winnipeg ©

Availability:Open access

Hill, N. S. (2015). Slipping Through the Chasms: The Experiences of Women Denied Midwifery Care ©

Availability:Open access

Howse, T. (2020). Gender, Indigeneity, and Trust in the Social Licence to Operate: The need for transformative power redistribution ©

Availability:Open access

Johannes, A. E.. (2013). People With Intellectual Disabilities as Leaders: Collaboratively Identifying Strategies For Success, Using Graphic Facilitation ©

Availability:Open access

Kakuk, M. (2018). Female Tactical Members in Correctional Services ©

Availability:Open access

Kinley, A. M. (2015). Empowerment in Online Practice: Exploring the potential for empowering outcomes and processes in an e-mentoring program for Aboriginal youth ©

Availability:Open access

Laforce, V. M. (2011). “WHEN I DANCE, I HEAR MY HEART SING”: A Feminist Ethnography of African Women’s Narrative of War, Displacement and Resettlement ©

Availability:Open access

Lauzon, A. (2017). Inclusive Policing in 21st Century Canada: Is a national inclusion strategy the answer? ©

Availability:Open access

Le Blanc, S. J. (2009). Reinserting women in to historical and contemporary child care: The politics of universal child care ©

Availability:Open access

Mclean, B. J. (2021). The Abbasid Legacy ©

Availability:Open access

Miller, S. A.. (2014). A Feminine Alternative: Marija Gimbutas and the Matrifocal Model ©

Availability:Open access

Ráine, H. L.. (2015). When Words Fail: The Communication of Pain through Art ©

Availability:Open access

Saare, B. SEYOUMN. (2009). Women, Gender Analysis and Agriculture in Eritrea: Women as Effective Agents of Change ©

Availability:Open access

Shippey-heilman, A. MARGARET. (2022). The Impact of COVID-19 on Faculty Mental Health and Well-Being: A Qualitative Description ©

Availability:Open access

Silman, S. (2013). The Differentiation Effect: Survival Instincts and the Origin of Discrimination ©

Availability:Open access

Smith, A. SEAMUS. (2020). Relocating the Finnish Line: Radical Democracy, Marginalised Identities, and Educational Possibilities ©

Availability:Open access

Stone, C. M. (2017). What I Am is Who I Will Be: An Integrated Analysis of the Sex-Gender System, Nature Discourse and the Maternal Instinct ©

Availability:Open access

Thorlakson, M. A. (2012). Environmental Illness and Social Justice ©

Availability:Open access

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