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Digital Thesis & Project Room

 

DTPR MAIS: Athabasca University Digital Thesis & Project Room

 
 
Description

MAIS 701: Integrated Project. Mais 701 is normally the final course that students take in their program and is designed to facilitate extended research work under the direction of a course professor. The scope of the project must fall within the research area of faculty members associated with MAIS. The Integrated Project allows students to explore an intellectual question, to relate their research to a work situation, or to engage a community problem. Theoretical and empirical approaches should draw from the student's course work and demonstrate an integrative approach to knowledge creation. The project may involve field, archival, and library research, and will result in the production of a major report or paper. A project may combine a theoretical synopsis with applied work to produce an academic publication, innovative report, analysis, review, or enquiry into a chosen field. In other words, the project integrates learning from the MAIS program.

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Literary Studies

Andrew, L. K. (2015). Fear and the Monstrous Human: From Mary Shelley's Frankenstein to the Zombie Apocalypse of Max Brooks' World War Z ©

Availability:Open access

Bettiol, Jennifer J. (2016). “A Washing Away, a Vanishing”: Living with and Dying from Cancer in the Short Fiction of Alice Munro ©

Availability:Open access

Bigras, M. J.J.. (2016). Mainstream Canadian Writers: A Literary Review of Stolen Life by Rudy Wiebe and The Rüsslander by Sandra Birdsell ©

Availability:Open access

Bonnar, C. (2017). Âsokan – “Bridge”: Building the Bridge to Reconciliation, One Story at a Time ©

Availability:Open access

Isaac, S. M. (2016). Effects of the Highland Clearances on Selected Narrative Writing in Canada ©

Availability:Open access

Izerguina, T. (2016). Empowering Heroines in Goodnight Desdemona (Good Morning Juliet) and Harlem Duet ©

Availability:Open access

Kennedy, S. A. (2020). Shared Experiences and Their Negative Outcomes: Interconnection in the Short Story Cycles of Sherwood Anderson and Edward P. Jones ©

Availability:Open access

Maclean, T. M. (2016). THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF FICTION TO TRUTH RECOVERY – AN EXPLORATION OF THE EXPERIENCE IN NORTHERN IRELAND ©

Availability:Open access

Mann, S. E. (2014). More-than-Survival Strategies: Sex Workers' Unhappy Stories ©

Availability:Open access

Maron, D. D. (2017). Digital Whiplash: Collective Attention in the Context of Digital Activism ©

Availability:Open access

Munro, A. C.. (2019). Dichotomy, Domesticity, and Dominance: Sex and Gender Bias in Archaeological Research and Its Implications for How We Interpret the Past and the Present ©

Availability:Open access

Offenwanger, A. M.. (2014). Once Upon a Movie Screen: Four Favourite Fairy Tales and Their Disney Film Adaptations ©

Availability:Open access

Schmolling, J. (2020). Jane, the Feminist: The Representation of Female Friendships in Jane Austen’s Six Novels and their Social Commentary ©

Availability:Open access

Street, R. (2013). A Grounded Theory Journey into the Black Personhood as it Rises out of Antebellum Slavery ©

Availability:Open access

Urkow, J. (2019). HOW DO WE GET THERE FROM HERE?: AN INVESTIGATION INTO CURRENT BEST PRACTICES IN HIGH SCHOOL ACADEMIC WRITING ©

Availability:Open access

Wotherspoon, G. (2015). Social Commentary in Detective Fiction By African Women Authors ©

Availability:Open access

Young, C. L. (2014). Respect, Postcolonialism and the Writing of Freya Stark ©

Availability:Open access

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